Whether you want to make just one jar of refrigerator dill pickles or several, this is the perfect recipe. Keeping brine in your fridge makes it so easy.

What foods say ‘summer’ to you? Watermelon surely is on that list, in addition to ice cream and hamburgers…right? And while thanks to the science of preserving dill pickles are eaten year round, making refrigerator dill pickles is surely a summer thing given the fresh cucumbers that are hanging from the vines in our gardens.

Are you a dill pickle person or a sweet pickle person? I am fully, without equivocation, in the dill pickle camp. There are very few foods I really don’t like but sweet pickles and bread and butter pickles are at the top of that list (sorry if I’ve offended any of my sweet pickle friends). But, dill pickles? They are at the top of my ‘foods I love’ list..and that list of my family members as well.

And not just any dill pickles…we are die-hard Clausen-type pickle people…the refrigerated kind of pickle that crunches when you bite into it. No heated pickles in this house.

Did you Know: We have William Shakespeare to thank for the phrase “in a pickle”; “How cam’st thou in this pickle?” and “I have been in such a pickle” are lines in The Tempest.

So with a booming cucumber crop this summer, we are a “in a (happy) pickle!” ( I know, but I just couldn’t resist!)

We grow two varieties of cucumbers each summer, a pickler and a regular slicing cucumber. This year we planted 3 Boston Pickling Cucumbers and 3 Dasher II Cucumbers, lovely dark green slicing cucumbers. Since amending my soil this spring, our cucumbers are doing much better than last year and I’ve already put up 8 jars of pickles, though there are only 5 jars left…hmmm….Whether you want to make just one jar of refrigerator dill pickles or several, this is the perfect recipe. Keeping brine in your fridge makes it so easy.

With my three pickler vines, I get a steady stream of about 2-3 cukes every other day or so.  I like to can them as soon as possible to keep them as crisp as possible which pretty much necessitates me putting up a jar every other day or so. 

So I ‘developed’ a recipe that helps me quickly can the cukes when harvested.  This recipe is based on a variety of recipes I have used in my quest of replicating that Clausen pickle taste that we are seeking and has the additional benefit of leaving out some of the unnecessary (in my book) additives that even my beloved Clausens contain.

The element of this recipe that allows for the quick processing of your picklers is to mix up a batch of the brine (water, vinegar and salt) and keep it in your fridge. Once you have a enough cucumbers for a jar (2-3 picklers typically fill a pint jar) it’s just a matter of preparing your cukes, adding some garlic, mustard seed, dill and filling your jar with your prepared brine. Done and Done!

 

Easy Refrigerator Dill PicklesWhether you want to make just one jar of refrigerator dill pickles or several, this is the perfect recipe. Keeping brine in your fridge makes it so easy.

Did you Know: In his 1492 voyage in which he discovered America, Columbus rationed pickles to his sailors to keep them from getting scurvy. He even grew cucumbers during his stop in Haiti to restock for the rest of the voyage.

Whether you want to make just one jar of refrigerator dill pickles or several, this is the perfect recipe. Keeping brine in your fridge makes it so easy.

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Jar by Jar, Crisp Refrigerator Dill Pickles

This recipe will make it easy for you to put up a jar at a time of crisp and dilly delicious refrigerator dill pickles. The ingredients listed are for each pint of dill pickles

Course Side Dish

Ingredients

  • 2-3 pickling cucumbers prepared as you wish...sliced, spears or whole
  • 4 sprigs of dill
  • 1/2-1 clove of garlic sliced
  • 1/2 tsp mustard seed
  • Pickle Brine

Pickle Brine

  • 2 quarts cold water
  • 6 ounces apple cider vinegar
  • 3 ounces pickling salt

Instructions

  1. Wash your pickles well and remove the blossom end.

  2. Slice them as desired...I typically keep sliced, spears and whole pickles on hand so I check my pickle stash and see which type we are low on.

  3. Add mustard seed, garlic and dill sprigs to your jar, then put your prepared cucumbers in.

  4. Add the brine to fill the jar and cover your cucumbers. If I have some parts of the cucumbers that rise above the brine, I snip of a piece of the cuke so that all parts of all cucumbers are submerged below the brine.


  5. Put lids on your jars and refrigerate. Because these are not being canned and instead kept in your refrigerator, you don't need special jars...just make sure the jars and their lids are clean.
  6. Our jars typically don't make it past one week before someone starts snacking, but if you can let them sit for 2-3 weeks they have more time for the flavor to develop. I've read that you should consume them before 3-4 months...we've never had any that last that long.

Pickle Brine

  1. Mix all ingredients and stir until salt is dissolved.


  2. Store in a container in your refrigerator.

Did you Know: On Average, Americans consume more than 9 pounds of pickles per person annually and dills are consumed twice as much as sweet (no surprise there!)

This is the perfect recipe for refrigerator dill pickles. Keeping brine in your fridge makes it so easy.

If you are not interested in mixing up a batch of the brine, but just want to put up a jar ..here are the ingredient measurements you’ll need.  

This recipe will work for a pint, so if you are filling a quart jar…just double everything. I used my ball jars just because I have them, but any jar will do as long as it’s clean.

If you don’t have a copy of my Measuring Equivalents Chart…this is when it really comes in handy. It’s available in the Subscriber Benefits Library for all Nourish and Nestle Subscribers.

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Single Jar of Crisp Refrigerator Dill Pickles

Course Side Dish

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cold water
  • 1 1/2 TB apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tsp pickling salt

Instructions

  1. Mix ingredients well and pour over cucumbers, making sure to cover all parts of all cucumbers.

    Seal jar and refrigerate for at least a week and up to 3-4 months

Whether you want to make just one jar of refrigerator dill pickles or several, this is the perfect recipe. Keeping brine in your fridge makes it so easy.

So there you have it my friends…easy peasy refrigerator dill pickles. I plucked 3 picklers off of the vines last night, so I’m heading to the kitchen to add to my dill pickle inventory. And since Kate (aka ‘The Incredible Pickle Consumer’) is home for a couple of days pickle my inventory will be quickly depleted.Whether you want to make just one jar of refrigerator dill pickles or several, this is the perfect recipe. Keeping brine in your fridge makes it so easy.

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Hugs, 


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18 Comments

  1. Kathy Stephens

    July 5, 2017 at 10:12 am

    Lynn…have you tried your mix with okra? I have a bumper crop this year!!

    Reply
    • lynn

      July 5, 2017 at 10:47 am

      Hi Kathy, I have not tried it on okra! In doing a quick search on the internet, it seems that the recipes for refrigerator okra pickles call for much more vinegar than what I use for my cucumber pickles. BUT…there’s no reason you couldn’t mix up a batch of the brine in the recipes for okra pickles and keep that in your fridge…right?

      Let me know what you do…I’m curious.

      Thanks for stopping by.

      Lynn

      Reply
  2. 4lmbonly

    July 5, 2017 at 10:21 am

    Thanks, love Clausen dill pickles, gotta try this recipe!

    Reply
    • lynn

      July 5, 2017 at 10:49 am

      Oh good! I hope you enjoy it as much as we do. I just sent a couple of jars back with my daughter, so I hope to be replenishing my stock soon. It does seem that they are getting eaten quicker than I can make them and I don’t think any of my jars have made it to the 2 week point yet!

      Thanks for stopping by and wishing you a fantastic Wednesday!

      Hugs, Lynn

      Reply
  3. Sarah

    July 5, 2017 at 2:18 pm

    These sound like the perfect pickles, nice and crunchy. Thanks for the history lesson too, this post was so much fun to read!

    Reply
    • lynn

      July 7, 2017 at 1:49 pm

      Oh they are so tasty! Hope you enjoy them and glad you learned a little pickle lore!

      Hugs, Lynn

      Reply
  4. Carolann

    July 6, 2017 at 9:48 am

    My hubby loves pickles so I will have to try t his recipe for sure! They look so delicious! I love learning all the pickle facts! Thanks for sharing this!

    Reply
    • lynn

      July 7, 2017 at 1:48 pm

      Carolann…I hope he enjoys them as much as we do. In fact, we were away from home for just the past 2 days and I’ve got to get busy pickling all the little cucumbers that ripened in my absence.

      Have a great weekend.

      Hugs, Lynn

      Reply
  5. Sam @ Raggedy Bits

    July 6, 2017 at 7:25 pm

    These pickles sound so divine! Will be trying for sure!!

    Reply
    • lynn

      July 7, 2017 at 1:47 pm

      Sam, when your summer rolls around you’ll have to give them a try…so easy and so tasty. And can be altered with more or less garlic and spices to suit your taste.
      Enjoy!

      Hugs, Lynn

      Reply
  6. Linda at Mixed Kreations

    July 7, 2017 at 8:35 am

    I love dill pickles, and bread and butter pickles, but don’t care for sweet pickles. I have been wanting to try and make some spicy refrigerator pickles. Years ago I use to can pickles, but this would be so much easier. I will have to try these.

    Reply
    • lynn

      July 7, 2017 at 1:46 pm

      Linda, these pickles are so very easy to make that it’s almost embarrassing…you can have fresh pickles on your table with just the littlest bit of effort. Hope you all enjoy them.

      Hugs, Lynn

      Reply
  7. Lynne

    July 17, 2017 at 12:05 pm

    Thank you for this. My pickle vines don’t produce enough pickles to do large batches of them, and this looks like a great idea. I’m also looking for Sweet Pickle Refrigerator recipes that are tried and true.

    Reply
    • lynn

      July 17, 2017 at 7:25 pm

      Hi Lynne, it’s perfect for small batches of cukes…that’s exactly why I bottle the brine. Good luck with the sweet pickles! And happy canning.

      Hugs, Lynn

      Reply
  8. Sauerkraut Billy

    August 14, 2017 at 6:17 pm

    These look great! Is there a good way to get bread and butter pickles super thin? It seems like the ones you have are a little more thick than my family usually likes.. Maybe a food processor slicer or a mandoline? Not sure, gonna have to do some research! Thanks so much for sharing!

    Reply
    • lynn

      August 15, 2017 at 6:56 am

      Hmmm…I would guess that a mandoline would work…I can’t think why it wouldn’t. If you don’t mind, do pop back in and let us know what worked for you.

      Have a wonderful week,

      Hugs, Lynn

      Reply
  9. Lauren

    August 28, 2017 at 7:21 pm

    So we made it 8 days before “tasting” them, aka eating 1/2 the jar. My husband claimed them to be the best pickles ever. The cucumbers we used are from a neighbor who is practically dumping them on us, as mine didn’t do well this year, she used the disclaimer that they aren’t very flavorful and probably better off as chicken food but I just couldn’t do that with all of them. We will be making at least a few more batches….but I suppose we will give some to the chickens for her too.

    Reply
    • lynn

      August 28, 2017 at 8:00 pm

      OH YIPPEE Lauren!

      You just made my day! I am so glad you and yours are loving these pickles…my family certainly does!

      And I’ve had my share of ‘yucky’ cucumbers as well. Gardening is such a gamble some times. But thankfully you’re neighbor needed to offload some!

      Thank you so much for popping in and letting me know how much you all enjoyed them.

      Many hugs, Lynn

      So glad you’ll save a few for the chicks…they need yummies too!

      Reply

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