So, this is one of those posts where I tell you to ‘do as I say, not as I do’.  I’ll get to that part of the story soon, but first, here’s the situation.

We have a light fixture in our Master Bathroom that started to show some rust.  We do have a steam shower in there and I guess we weren’t as diligent as we should have been in using the exhaust fan.  (We’re better now).

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Anyway, the light fixture is up rather high and my husband never even noticed the rust, but I noticed it when changing the bulbs and it kinda bugged me. I’ve been pondering ways to cover up the rust for a year now, and recently realized that Rub’n Buff was my answer.  I’ve used this product before and have been pleased with the results.  Rub’n Buff is a metallic wax that comes in 12 colors and I’ve had great success with it on picture frames.

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How I did it:

  • I taped up paper behind and around the fixture.  Rub’n Buff dries very quickly and if I got it on the wall, I knew it was there to stay.
  • I needed to sand down the rusty areas, which was much easier than I thought.  Here’s where the ‘do as I say, not as I do’ part comes in.  I should have gone ahead and sanded, deglossed and/or primed the areas that weren’t rusty as well.  It seems that Rub n’ buff needs to have a porous surface to adhere to and the sanding gives it that.  In the areas that I didn’t sand/prime the surface, the product will rub off (not real easily, but if you take your finger and rub on it, you will get a little residue).  I will say, in my defense, that I scoured the internet and all I read about Rub’n Buff is that it will adhere to just about anything, with no real prep needed.   C’est la vie.  Since this fixture is 8 feet off of the ground and won’t be touched at all, I’m not stressing about it for now.
  • Then I wiped down the fixture REALLY well to remove sand dust and regular dust/dirt.
  • I then applied the Rub’n Buff.  This stuff is really easy to work with.  I have found it works best for me to put on rubber gloves and use my finger to apply it.
  • I had some Silver Leaf Rub’n Buff, but knew that was too ‘silvery’ and bright for what I wanted.  So I got some of the Pewter product.  My Michael’s store has the gold and silver, but I had to order the pewter from Amazon.
  • I found that the Pewter was a little too dark, so then I went back over it lightly with some of the Silver Leaf.  This time I used a toothbrush as I didn’t want a real complete coverage.
  • I like the look of the of the silver over the pewter…it has a bit of a tin or galvanized steel look to it.
  • I did buff the fixture after I was done, which is when I noticed that it rubbed off in the real smooth areas.
  • What I would do different next time:  I would try a deglosser and/or prime the metal.  There are 2 primers that I have used recently.  XIM Primer and Rust-Oleum Clean Metal Primer.  I’m pretty impressed with the XIM and the label states that it adheres to both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, so I’d probably give that a whirl first.
  • rub n buff light fixture after

I did a little sample for you to see the difference between the pewter and the silver leaf, and the two together.

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